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Workshop Registration

On 24th and 25th May 2021, we invite you to participate in a variety of workshops, hosted by artists and researchers. Read the program below and register for the workshops you want to join!

Please note that participation is limited for most workshops and registration is mandatory.

Scripting Observable with RiScript

Daniel Howe

This workshop presents a hands-on introduction to the RiTa v2.0 tools, including the new RiScript language. Version 2 of RiTa is a complete rewrite of the library that is easier-to-use, faster and more powerful. The workshop will cover the basics of RiTa and RiScript in JavaScript, with a specific focus on the Observable notebook environment. The number of addition topics covered, and the depth to which they are explored, will vary in relation to the time allotted by conference organizers and the experience of participants. While no specific skills are required for participation, familiarity with JavaScript and a basic knowledge of programming concepts (conditionals, variables, loops, etc.) will be assumed.

Time and Date

Monday 24th May 2021

UTC: 11:00-13:45
Bergen/Aarhus: 13:00-15:45
New Delhi: 16:30-19:15
Toronto: 07:00-09:45
Washington: 04:00-06:30

Prerequisites

Familiarity with JavaScript and a basic knowledge of programming concepts (conditionals, variables, loops, etc.) will be assumed. Please create a free account on observablehq.com before the workshop.

Platforms/Equipment

Zoom

Biography

Daniel Howe is an American artist and educator. His art practice focuses on the writing (and close reading) of computer algorithms as a means to examine contemporary culture. Exploring issues such as privacy, surveillance, disinformation and representation, his work spans a range of media, including multimedia installations, artist books, sound recordings and software interventions. He currently lives in Hong Kong where he teaches at the School of Creative Media.
https://rednoise.org/daniel

Queer/Femme Internet Aesthetics

Katie Schaag

This fun, playful, one-hour workshop is primarily intended for participants who identify as women, femme, nonbinary, trans, and/or queer. However, anyone is welcome to attend. What’s a queer femme aesthetic? I conceptualize it as a hyper-saturated, self-conscious, postmodern, performative femininity. Glitter, sequins, lip gloss, nail polish, dELiA*s magazine, ‘90s neon pink and slime green. Digitally, the queer femme aesthetic was innovated in spaces like Tumblr and MySpace, with tools like Blingee and Angelfire Dollz. Of course, there is no one definition of a queer/femme digital aesthetic, though I’d argue that the nail polish emoji is pretty key! In this workshop, we’ll first explore how and why net artists like Olia Lialina, Marisa Olson, and Momo Pixel break “good design” rules and embrace a Web 1.0 aesthetic. Queer femme internet aesthetics often intentionally subvert minimalist design principles and usability heuristics, making the user aware of the platform/medium rather than concealing it. Building on the “Queer & Femme Digital Literature” panel that I chaired at AWP 2020, featuring Sarah Ciston, Sam Cohen, Kate Durbin, Feliz Lucia Molina, and Sandra Rosales (https://www.awpwriter.org/awp_conference/event_detail/17596), we’ll also discuss these multimedia aesthetics in a literary context. Then, we’ll experience digital femme history and culture firsthand through the embodied limitations and affordances of using web 1.0 technology: participants will make an old-fashioned glitter GIF. Although the 1.0 Blingee aesthetics are echoed in contemporary Instagram and Snapchat stickers, we’ll use one of the “original” platforms, clunky by our current standards, to experience not only the aesthetics but also the tools and techniques inherent to the platform that enabled those aesthetics. Since the Blingee platform, developed in 2006, is no longer functional, we’ll use the open-access platform GlitterPhoto (https://www.glitterphoto.net/), developed in 2003. Finally, we'll share our creations and think together toward queer femme digital aesthetic futures. Participants will need to have access to a web browser (Chrome or Firefox).

Time and Date

Monday 24th May 2021

UTC: 14:00-15:15
Bergen/Aarhus: 16:00-17:15
New Delhi: 19:30-20:45
Toronto: 10:00-11:15
Washington: 07:00-08.15

Prerequisites

Participants will need to have access to a web browser (Chrome or Firefox).

Platforms/Equipment

Chrome; GlitterPhoto

Biography

Katie Schaag, PhD, is a scholar, artist, writer, curator, and educator. She is currently a Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication at Georgia Tech. She was previously a Mendota Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in the English Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a 2017 Humanities Without Walls National Fellow. She has collaborated with the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, Madison Public Library, UW Arts Institute, and UW Center for the Humanities to curate and orchestrate grant-funded public arts and humanities symposia, workshops, talks, and performances. She earned her PhD in English Literature at UW-Madison, with a specialization in Performance Studies and Visual Cultures and a minor in Fine Art and Creative Writing. As a consultant at UW Design Lab, a transmedia storytelling center dedicated to democratizing digitality, she developed curricular materials for emerging “smart media” genres such as visual essays, podcasts, and presentations. She co-founded the A. W. Mellon Art + Scholarship Workshop and the Madison Performance Philosophy Collective, and co-curated a series of Theory-Practice Collaboratories and Mad Theory symposia. As a multimedia artist, she exhibits and performs nationally and internationally, and teaches public workshops on performance, creative writing, and art as activism.
http://katieschaag.com/ 

Platform Dive: Netprov and Performance in Videoconferencing

Rob Wittig, Cathy Podeszwa

In this workshop we will bounce about in the egg carton of zoom and experiment with ways to dissolve the 6th wall (the camera) (the other 5 being: the 3 walls of the room and the 2 side walls of the image frame) through collaborative story and through dance and physical performance. Building on the practice of netprov — internet improv, online roleplay narrative — we will use words and movement to explore those zones of video meeting practice that have yet to coalesce into social norms: awkward beginnings, sudden disappearances, background guests, dropped connections, mis-timings, garbles, and lags. Each of these can lead to narrative. We also will build on art history and comics to experiment with ways to make the platform’s grid echo and expand shared visual traditions, or, comically, to play against them. We will share and co-create methods and moments you can apply in art and education.

Time and Date

Monday 24th May 2021

UTC: 14:00-15:15
Bergen/Aarhus: 16:00-17:15
New Delhi: 19:30-20:45
Toronto: 10:00-11:15
Washington: 07:00-08:15

Prerequisites

If possible, bring: 1) a few interesting images to use as virtual backgrounds, 2) intriguing objects to use as props, 3) pets, puppets, or figurines.

Platforms/Equipment

Zoom

Biographies

Rob Wittig plays at the crossroads of literature, graphic design and digital culture. A Silicon Valley native, he co-founded the legendary IN.S.OMNIA electronic bulletin board with the Surrealist-style literary and art group Invisible Seattle. From this came a Fulbright grant to study the writing and graphic design of electronic literature with philosopher Jacques Derrida in Paris. Rob's book based on that work, "Invisible Rendezvous," was published Wesleyan University Press. He then embarked on a series of illustrated and designed email and web fictions. Many of his projects are now taught in Electronic Literature curricula in North America and Europe. Alongside his creative projects, Rob has worked in major publishing and graphic design firms in Chicago, leading R&D teams. In 2011 Rob earned an MA in Digital Culture (equivalent to a US MFA) at the University of Bergen, Norway. His book Netprov: Networked Improvised Literature for the Classroom and Beyond. Rob is Assistant professor in the Art & Design and Writing Studies departments of the University of Minnesota Duluth.
http://meanwhilenetprov.com/

Cathy Podeszwa is an ecologist, writer, actor, dancer, and generally inquisitive animal. She is a graduate of Carleton College and the University of Minnesota Duluth, where she earned an MS degree in Environmental Biology and Applied and Computational Mathematics. She has participated in many Netprovs, including “The Mysteries” and “Fishnet Stockings” with Joellyn Rock, “The Speidi Show” and “Grace Wit & Charm” with Rob Wittig and Mark Marino, “All Time High” with Claire Donato, and “Thermophiles in Love” with Samara Hayley Steele, Rob Wittig and Mark Marino. Cathy is a performer and choreographer with the Freshwater Dance Collective in Duluth. She is also a comedy writer and performer with Rubber Chicken Theater and the local PBS show, Twin Ports Tonight. She teaches a variety of environmental science and biology courses at Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College in Cloquet, MN. One of her great joys in life is translating biological concepts into dance or comedic sketches.

Presently Performing Tele-Presence Pleasantly

Boyd Branch, Piotr Mirowski, Kory Mathewson

In this interactive workshop, participants will be introduced to two platforms that can facilitate online communication and storytelling. These platforms include our own open source tool Virtual Director, developed in TouchDesigner, for compositing multiple participants in a shared virtual space in order to communicate tele-immersively [1], as well as open-source creativity helpers such as an automated slide generator [2].The workshop will start with warm-up exercises taken from improvised comedy practice, and conclude with short live improvised presentations made by the participants. Over the course of the workshop, participants will learn a range of skills and best practices, derived from applied improvisation and cinematographic language, that will help them foster a sense of presence, connection, and creativity in digitally immersed environments. In Part I: “Virtual Director - Designing tools for improvisation”, participants will learn how to use our own open source tool for facilitating live interactive tele-immersive performance, rehearsal, and improvisation. In Part II: “The virtual theatre DJ/VJ: Directing ensembles in virtual spaces”, participants will engage in a series of games and activities that demonstrate best practices for helping performers feel connected and present with each other, facilitating physical and emotional connection through the visual language of cinema and the pedagogy of improvisation.

Time and Date

 

Monday 24th May 2021

UTC: 15:30-18:00
Bergen/Aarhus: 17:30-20:00
New Delhi: 21:00-23:30
Toronto: 11:30-14:00
Washington: 8:30-11:00

Platforms/Equipment

Zoom; Chrome

Biographies

Boyd Branch is the founder and director of the London-based Improvisational Media and Performance Lab, which explores how improvisational pedagogies can be utilized to create accessible, adaptive, and socially supportive technologies. He has been a troupe member of Improbotics since 2018. A former Fulbright fellow, he holds an M.F.A. in interdisciplinary digital media from Arizona State University, and an M.A. in theatre studies from the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands. He is currently a Vice-Chancellor’s Fellow at the University of Kent.
http://www.improvmedialab.com/

Piotr Mirowski, a theatre actor and researcher in AI, co-founded AI-enabled improv companies HumanMachine and Improbotics. Experimenting with AI for artistic human and machine-based co-creation, he created shows featuring robots and chatbots that have toured internationally. Piotr obtained a PhD in computer science in 2011 at New York University as well as a Diploma in Acting at London School of Dramatic Art (2015-2017). Piotr works as Staff Research Scientist at DeepMind on AI research.
https://piotrmirowski.com/

Kory Mathewson is a Research Scientist with DeepMind and a Machine Learning Lab Scientist with the Creative Destruction Lab. He holds a Ph.D. in Computing Science from the University of Alberta. His research interests include interactive machine learning, human-in-the-loop deep reinforcement learning, human-robot interfaces, prosthetic robotics, and conversational dialogue systems. Kory is an accomplished improvisational theatre performance artist with Rapid Fire Theatre.
https://korymathewson.com/

Creating Story Instruments with Stepworks 2

Erik Loyer

In this workshop, attendees will learn to create "story instruments," a genre of performative e-lit with a very simple interaction model. In a story instrument, the author decides *what* happens, and the user, through a one-button interface, determines *when* it happens. This form, with its inherent connections to music, video games, interactive comics, and slide presentations, has been used to collaboratively remix the works of noted California poets, sonify the history of Mars exploration, create multi-vocal lyric videos for Hamilton, and visualize samples of martial arts films in hip-hop tracks — to name just a few applications. The software attendees will use to create their story instruments is Stepworks 2, a new version of the web-based tool I first introduced in 2017. Stepworks (http://step.works) has been described as "an ideal platform for teaching e-literature through feminist critical making pedagogies" (Sarah Whitcomb Laiola, "Back in a Flash: Critical Making Pedagogies to Counter Technological Obsolescence" [The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy, December 10, 2020]). It can be used to create interactive works, live-streamed presentations, or linear videos (one example being last year's popular ELO talk "Temporal Aesthetics in Digital Comics: An Introduction for Makers and Researchers"). Stepworks standardizes multimodal interactive media in a way that simplifies authoring, while collapsing the boundaries between text, visual, audio, and musical content. Instead of tracks or layers, Stepworks features "characters" who take actions in discrete steps. Each character appears as a rectangular panel that can be rendered anywhere on screen. When a character "speaks" a word, that word appears in its panel. When they "show" a video, that video fills the panel's area. Put another way, Stepworks takes the visual logic of Zoom we've been living with during the pandemic — in which each box equals a person — and allows authors to build on it in creative ways. Stepworks 2 introduces a web-based authoring environment to augment the Google Sheets model launched with Stepworks 1, making possible more sophisticated compositions (even including the user's webcam) while maintaining ease of use. Attendees will come away from the workshop with basic knowledge of the tool, and free accounts which they can continue to use afterward (while Stepworks will ultimately include a paid tier to support continued development, the essential set of authoring features will continue to be free, and its file format is open and JSON-based). The workshop will be held over Zoom, and participants (up to 15) will be required to use the Chrome web browser. Each attendee will use Stepworks to follow along with workshop activities, creating their own experiments using media they possess locally or find online. Attendees will be encouraged to show progress via screen sharing, and will save their work locally, while also learning how to publish projects online (a secondary account like a GitHub account may be required for this). Finally, participants will receive tips for using Stepworks to expose students to basic e-lit creation in a classroom setting.

Time and Date

Monday 24th May 2021

UTC: 18:00-21:15
Bergen/Aarhus: 20:00-23:15
New Delhi: 23:30-02:45 (ends 25th May)
Toronto: 14:00-17:15
Washington: 11:00-14.15

Prerequisites

Participants should bring any text, imagery, audio (.mp3 format), and/or video (.mp4 format) they would like to work with during the workshop. Melodies are welcome as well.

Platforms/Equipment

Zoom; Chrome

Biography

Erik Loyer builds software artworks and creative tools that adapt difficult subjects into stories people can play like instruments. His web and mobile works explore social justice and spirituality while combining elements of comics, video games, and interactive music, and his work has received international recognition in the digital humanities, electronic literature, independent games, and interactive comics fields.
http://erikloyer.com/

Translating and Visualising Storyspace Classics for the Web. A User-Friendly Framework

Mariusz Psarski,  Michał Furgał

The workshop is directed towards authors and translators of hypertext fiction and poetry created in Storyspace. We demonstrate the future direction of the in-house development environment used for translation and migration of Michael Joyce’s afternoon.a story (2011) and Twilight. A Symphony (2015) into browser/online ports. The framework has been recently updated to its third edition which – apart from its support for guard fields, roadmaps, link scripting – introduces form-based import layer and a mobile friendly visualizations of Storyspace Map Views based on D3.js JavaScript library. During the workshop a workflow of importing the work, processing its metadata, and preparing the linking system for the visualization module will be demonstrated and analysed. The hypertexts used during the workshop are: Izme Pass by C. Guyer, M. Joyce, and M. Petry; WOE by M. Joyce, and The Life of Geronimo Sandoval by S. Ersinghaus. Participants will prepare an html export from Storyspace and be able to then upload these files on a server for further processing in order to prepare an online, mobile friendly version of a Storyspace work. BACKGROUND: More than 20 years after their publication web-based hypertexts such as Hegirascope or The Unknown are available, read and viewed just as intended on their publication date. “Html and a bit of Javascript” or “Javascript and a bit of html”, in case of Web based text generators such as Taroko Gorge, seem to constitute the best formula for creating long-lasting e-literature. Any platform, old or new, which supports exporting to html improves not only the longevity of the work, but can also bring it new life on platforms of the future. Important platforms, most notably Flash, did not follow this path. Some platforms, including Storyspace, did. In spite of being a paid software and the popular perception of it as a platform for commercial circulation of e-literature, Storyspace managed to preserve its path to open formats in form of its html export functionality (although by default in limited form).

Time and Date

Tuesday 25th May 2021

UTC: 12:30-13:45
Bergen/Aarhus: 14:30-15:45
New Delhi: 18:00-19:15
Toronto: 08:30-09:45
Washington: 05:00-06:30

Prerequisites

No skills required, but prior knowledge of Storyspace platform would be good.

Platforms/Equipment

Mac computers and a web browser are needed. Windows users welcome, although they might have a bit less hands-on work to do.

Biographies

Mariusz Psarski a hypertext scholar, translator and producer of e-literature in Poland. He has directed online translations and ports of Michael Joyce’s "afternoon. A story" and "Twilight. A Symphony." Research affiliate at Electronic Literature Lab, Washington State University Vancouver. 
http://techsty.art.pl/

Michał Furgał is a programmer and student at University of Information Technology and Management in Rzeszów, Poland.
https://en.uitm.edu.eu/

Erasure Poetry as E-Literature

Katie Schaag

Erasure is a powerful technique that allows contemporary creative writers, visual artists, and political activists to reveal underlying patterns within extant narratives. Perhaps because of its imbrication with book arts and other tactile forms, erasure poetry is relatively unexplored in the domain of e-literature. However, educational platforms like Wave Books’ interactive erasure poetry website, as well as recent artistic projects such as Amaranth Borsuk, Jesper Juul, and Nick Montfort’s web browser extension The Deletionist, Jacob Harris’s Times Haiku, and my own participatory platform The Infinite Woman demonstrate some of the possibilities for making and reading erasure poetry in a digital context. In this one-hour hands-on workshop, I’ll briefly introduce the form and technique of erasure in contemporary creative writing, looking at some physical examples (like Lauren Russell’s chalk erasure of Descent) in addition to the digital examples mentioned above. We’ll discuss the aesthetic and political choices in handcrafted and computationally generated erasure poems; consider erasure’s overlap with and distinction from other approaches like remix, appropriation, and conceptualism; and explore how erasure allows writers and artists to stretch and innovate poetic technique. Then, I’ll introduce a series of hands-on exercises designed to get participants quickly making their own physical and digital erasures. Participants will experiment with user-friendly tools to make their own erasure poems on a variety of platforms. Participants will need to have access to a web browser (Chrome or Firefox) and a word processor, as well as a design program. I’ll be using the free, user-friendly, online platform Canva in lieu of an Adobe product; if participants do not already have a design program, they should sign up for a free Canva account before the workshop (https://www.canva.com/). They will also need paper, scissors, pens or markers, found physical text (like a newspaper or electrical bill), and found digital text (like a speech, blog post, or literary passage).

Time and Date

Tuesday 25th May 2021

UTC: 14:00-15:15
Bergen/Aarhus: 16:00-17:15
New Delhi: 19:30-20:45
Toronto: 10:00-11:15
Washington: 07:00-08.15

Prerequisites

Sign up for a free Canva account (https://www.canva.com/) or open your preferred design program. Open a web browser (Chrome or Firefox) and a word processor such as Microsoft Word. Locate paper, scissors, and pens or markers. Select found physical text (like a newspaper or electrical bill) and found digital text (like a speech, blog post, or literary passage) that you wish to work with.

Platforms/Equipment

Chrome; word processor; design program (ex., Adobe, Canva).

Biography

Katie Schaag, PhD, is a scholar, artist, writer, curator, and educator. She is currently a Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication at Georgia Tech. She was previously a Mendota Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in the English Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a 2017 Humanities Without Walls National Fellow. She has collaborated with the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, Madison Public Library, UW Arts Institute, and UW Center for the Humanities to curate and orchestrate grant-funded public arts and humanities symposia, workshops, talks, and performances. She earned her PhD in English Literature at UW-Madison, with a specialization in Performance Studies and Visual Cultures and a minor in Fine Art and Creative Writing. As a consultant at UW Design Lab, a transmedia storytelling center dedicated to democratizing digitality, she developed curricular materials for emerging “smart media” genres such as visual essays, podcasts, and presentations. She co-founded the A. W. Mellon Art + Scholarship Workshop and the Madison Performance Philosophy Collective, and co-curated a series of Theory-Practice Collaboratories and Mad Theory symposia. As a multimedia artist, she exhibits and performs nationally and internationally, and teaches public workshops on performance, creative writing, and art as activism.
http://katieschaag.com/

Share to Heal / Comparte para sanar - Creative Digital Practices: Community Platform for Healing and Visualisation

María Mencía, Vinicius Marquet

The global coronavirus pandemic has brought up a series of challenges which have made us change our lifestyle by balancing work and family life, education and recreation. It has brought up feelings of uncertainty, isolation, hopelessness, fear, anxiety, depression, stress; impacting on our mental health and well-being as well as our economic situation. This global disaster has hitted harder those people from disadvantaged backgrounds, such as socioeconomic status, physical and health issues, living in violent and abusive relationships and has brought up to light the imbalance in society. For some of us, online platforms have served to make this situation more bearable. We are learning to do what we did before, at a distance. Based on this and previous creative projects where we were already dealing with a community-based goal, the aim of this workshop is to make visible (through sharing) social, personal or collective issues/challenges which have become more apparent during the pandemic. We will be using digital methodologies of collaboration and visualisation to highlight the main concerns of the community taking part in this discussion. For this purpose, we are providing you with an online platform where you will be able to share a personal or collective issue to heal. The shared stories will be distributed amongst the participants, who will find solutions to heal them through a creative digital proposal. All participants sharing and healing will be anonymous.

Time and Date

Tuesday 25th May 2021

UTC: 14:00-15:15
Bergen/Aarhus: 16:00-17:15
New Delhi: 19:30-20:45
Toronto: 10:00-11:15
Washington: 07:00-08:15

Prerequisites

Participants are required to bring a story elated to the social, personal or collective issues/challenges which have become more apparent during the pandemic. Participants can write their own story or copy-paste a story from a newspaper depending on personal preference. This will be the source of inspiration for other participants to come up with a project with the aim to heal the proposed issue. It is important to have the text digitally available in a word processor that can be copy-pasted during the workshop at the following link (do not access it before then): https://healing-and-mapping.herokuapp.com/ . The story should be no more than 250 words or 1500 characters.

Platforms/Equipment

Jitsi

Biographies

María Mencía is an Associate Professor in Media Arts and Course Leader of the BA in Media and Communication at Kingston School of Art, London, UK. She is an Executive Member of the Electronic Literature Organization Board of Directors (ELO) and book editor for the "Electronic Literature" series with ELO-Bloomsbury Press. In her creative research practice she explores the aesthetic techno-poetic space of visual-linguistic textualities through projects with a social significance.
https://www.kingston.ac.uk/staff/profile/dr-mariacutea-menciacutea-629/

Vinicius Marquet (Ciudad de México, 1982) is designer, author and researcher. He holds a BA in Visual communication by UNAM (MX); a MA in Interaction and Game design by HKU (NLD ) & The Open University (UK) and a postgraduate in digital storytelling by the Royal Academy of Fine Arts of Ghent (Bel). Currently he is a PhD student in Arts at KU Leuven / Luca School of the arts where he researches the remediation of collaborative storytelling workshops into the network and programmable media.
https://www.luca-arts.be/nl/vinicius-marquet-remediating-the-collaborative-storytelling-workshop-digital-mediated-spaces

Feeling without Touching

Laura Hyunjhee Kim

Feeling without Touching is a workshop inspired by John Koenig's The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows, a list of invented words that describe feelings that “give a name to emotions we all might experience but don’t yet have a word for.” Through a series of guided activities that include movement and writing with the body, participants will explore what it feels like to interact with one another without “physically” being in touch and reimagine new ways of languaging emotion in digital spaces.

Time and Date

Tuesday 25th May 2021

UTC: 20:00-21:15
Bergen/Aarhus: 22:00-23:15
New Delhi: 01:30-02:45 (26th May)
Toronto: 16:00-17:15
Washington: 13:00-14:15

Prerequisites

Writing materials (ie, pen, pencil, paper etc.); 1 glass of water; 1 small object or personal item. Participants are encouraged to wear comfortable clothing.

Platforms/Equipment

Zoom

Biography

Laura Hyunjhee Kim (b. Palo Alto, CA, USA) is a Korean-American multimedia artist who reimagines on/offline (non)human interactions and feelosophical experiences of the body. Thinking through making, she performs moments of incomprehension: when language loses its coherence, necessitates absurd leaps in logic, and reroutes into intuitive and improvisational sense-making forms of expression. Kim has shown work around the world, recently including the Transfer Gallery, Pioneer Works, Telematic Media Arts, Harvestworks, Bienal Internacional de Curitiba, Athens Digital Art Festival, Centro Cultural São Paulo, and The Wrong Biennale. Her projects have also appeared in the Lumen Prize for Art and Technology collection, The Denver Post, Westword, ArtSlant, Hyperallergic, KQED, Daily Serving, San Francisco Chronicle, and The Creators Project. She was an artist in residence at the Internet Archive (2017), Korea National University of the Arts (2017) and Electrofringe (with libi rose striegl as the collaborative duo sharing turtle™, 2019). Kim’s music video art SHARING IS CARING received the inaugural ArtSlant Award in New Media (2013) and her short feature video Marvelous Miramol was the first moving image to receive the Wisconsin Union Directorate Art Committee’s Sally Owen Marshall Best in Show Award (2010). In 2019, she received the New Media Caucus Distinguished Scholar Award. In 2020, she was a recipient of the Judson-Morrissey Excellence in New Media Award and also the Black Cube Video Art Award for her video Cricket World. Kim is the author of Entering the Blobosphere: A Musing on Blobs, which was published by The Accomplices / Civil Coping Mechanisms (June 17, 2019) and the coauthor of Remixing Persona: An Imaginary Digital Media Object from the Onto-tales of the Digital Afterlife with Mark Amerika, published with Open Humanities Press (November, 2019). She collaborates with numerous multidisciplinary artists and researchers including: Chris Corrente (on sound and music), libi rose striegl (on sharing turtle™), and Surabhi Saraf, M Eifler, Caroline Sinders, Marcus Brittain Fleming, Mariah Hill (on Centre for Emotional Materiality). Kim received a BS in Art from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, MFA from the New Genres Department at the San Francisco Art Institute, and PhD in Intermedia Art, Writing and Performance (IAWP) at the University of Colorado Boulder.
http://www.lauraonsale.com/

Infinite Narratives With The NIS System

David Nuñez Ruiz

The I Ching can tell you possibles futures. Depending on how 3 coins land in a series of tosses, you'll get a different fortune - stories of how you should or could procede. And in the classic Arabic nights, every night the sultan hears a different story. These are examples of multilinear texts. In this workshop you will create multilinear story that have so many different possibilities as to seem nearly infinite. We'll do this using Non Infinite Stories, a dynamic electronic publishing system that gives each reader their own unique story. For the reader, this means a captivating experience and for the writer, this opens possibilities of new storytelling with the combinations of specific fragments. The workshop is open to everyone without writing or technological skills. Technology is creating the opportunity to explore our creative ideas in ways previously unimaginable. In this workshop, you'll learn about the creative possibilties of Quantum Narratives and what it means not only for you as a writer, but also for the future of narrative storytelling.

Time and Date

Tuesday 25th May 2021

UTC: 20:00-22:00
Bergen/Aarhus: 22:00-00:00
New Delhi: 01:30-03:30 (26th May)
Toronto: 16:00-18:00
Washington: 13:00-15:00

Prerequisites

Brief homework sent to participants a few days in advance.

Platforms/Equipment

Zoom

Biography

David Nuñez Ruiz is a researcher, speaker, and digital narrator. He is a doctoral candidate in Digital Media, and is a professor of Narratives, Future Design, and Digital Tools at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, Centro and Universidad Iberoamericana. His speciality is in Storytelling and the future of narrative storytelling within the future of technology. He is also the author of books of essay and fiction, with a specialty in helping people create their own stories.
http://noninfinitestories.com/