Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

People and Partners

People

Conference chairs:

Partner chairs:

Global coordinator:

  • Caitlin Fisher

Conference program committee:

  • Christian Ulrik Andersen
  • Caitlin Fisher
  • Dene Grigar
  • Søren Bro Pold
  • Scott Rettberg
  • Anastasia Salter

Exhibition and performance program committee: 

  • Claire Donato
  • Astrid Ensslin
  • Ian Hatcher
  • Ambika Joshi
  • Nanditi Khilani
  • Claudia Kozaz
  • Erik Loyer
  • Kat Mustatea
  • Anna Nacher
  • Jason Nelson
  • Eamon O’Kane
  • Søren Pold
  • Scott Rettberg
  • Agat Sharma

Workshop coordinator:

  • Hannah Ackermans

Web Design:

  • Jason Nelson (exhibitions)
  • Gitte Grønning Munk (conference site)
  • Malthe Stavning Erslev (conference site)

Conference logos:

  • Lucila Mayol

Production:

  • Irene Fabri (Exhibition sites)
  • Carlota Salvador Megias (Logistics)
  • Ashleigh Steele (Video Production)
  • Malthe Stavning Erslev (Logistics & Chair of student assistants)
  • Anne Nielsen (Student assistant)
  • Mikkel-Theis Paulsen (Student assistant)
  • Emma Marie Kongsbak Bertelsen (Student assistant)
  • Line Marie Dissing Nielsen (Student assistant)
  • Matthias Bjørnestad (Student assistant)
  • Mattias Holmgaard Johansen (Conference video-jingle)

Conference Program Review Committee:

  • Hannah Ackermans
  • Christian Ulrik Andersen
  • Helen J Burgess
  • Susan Cronin
  • Giovanna Di Rosario
  • Oreto Doménech
  • Astrid Ensslin
  • Lai-Tze Fan
  • Caitlin Fisher
  • Dene Grigar
  • Marianne Gunderson
  • Davin Heckman
  • Anne Karhio
  • Asun López-Varela
  • Mark Marino
  • Vinicius Marquet
  • Maria Mencia
  • Stuart Moulthrop
  • Anna Nacher
  • Mariusz Pisarski
  • Søren Bro Pold
  • Scott Rettberg
  • Jill Walker Rettberg
  • Johannah Rodgers
  • Anastasia Salter
  • Perla Sasson-Henry
  • Lyle Skains
  • Joseph Tabbi
  • Rui Torres
  • David Thomas Henry Wright

Exhibitions program reviewer committee:

  • Alan Bigelow
  • Simon Biggs
  • John Cayley
  • Angela Chang
  • Leonardo Flores
  • Erika Fülöp
  • Maria Goicoechea
  • Claudia Kozak
  • Laurie Lax
  • Erik Loyer
  • Milton Läufer
  • Mark Marino
  • Nick Montfort
  • John Murray
  • Anna Nacher
  • Jason Nelson
  • Eamon O'Kane
  • Allison Parrish
  • Søren Bro Pold
  • Scott Rettberg
  • Samya Brata Roy
  • Winnie Soon
  • Joseph Tabbi
  • Zach Whalen

Performances program reviewer committee:

  • Ian Hatcher
  • Claire Donato
  • Erik Loyer
  • Kat Mustatea

Conference partners

The Electronic Literature Organization (ELO) is an international organization dedicated to the investigation of literature produced for the digital medium. Founded in Chicago, Illinois in 1999, the ELO now has a presence across North America and in South America, Europe, Asia, Australia, and Africa.  Our members hail from a wide array of disciplines and areas of study, including Art, Literature, Communication, Computer Science, Humanities, Digital Humanities, Media Studies, Womens’ Studies, and Comparative Media.

Aarhus University, Digital Aesthetics Research Center (DARC) functions as a shared intellectual resource that identifies, analyses, and mediates current research topics within digital art and culture; producing experiments, research projects, publications and public events. The aim is to create a space for critical reflection on digital cultural transformation. The centre was formed in 2002. The purpose of the centre is to bring together researchers at Aarhus University with an interest in digital art and culture (net., software, code, sound etc.). The centre organises invited talks, seminars and conferences like the seminal Read me conference and Runme Dorkbot City Camp in 2004. DARC has hosted research projects such as The Aesthetics of Interface Culture, published working papers and dissertations on digital art and culture.

DARC maintains its focus on bringing together researchers at Aarhus University, forming research projects, collaborations and international networks. We publish newspapers and a journal, APRJA, arrange yearly international PhD seminars (with transmediale festival and shifting partners), internal research seminars, larger research conferences, and organize public exhibitions and events with digital media artists and researchers from around the world. Besides contributing analytically and theoretically to the field, DARC also engages in practical experiments (often in collaboration with artists and practitioners). DARC researchers have for example collaborated with Danish and international libraries for more than 10 years on promoting and exhibiting electronic literature.

The Bergen Electronic Literature Research Group (BEL) studies literary works created for digital media and relate digital art forms. In 2021, our research group is  co-organizing the ELO 2021 Conference and Festival: Platform (Post?) Pandemic, the most important annual conference in the field. An important project for us is the ELMCIP Electronic Literature Knowledge Base, the  most extensive open-access research database in the international field. Our research often combines theory and practice, as in the award-winning VR narrative Hearts and Minds, winner of the 2016 Robert Coover Award for a Work of Electronic Literature. Members of our group frequently publish scholarship on electronic literature, including recently Digital Fiction and the Unnatural: Transmedial Narrative Theory, Method, and Analysis by Astrid Ensslin (Ohio State, 2021), the two-volume Post-Digital: Dialogues and Debates from Electronic Book Review, edited by Joseph Tabbi (Bloomsbury, 2020), and  Electronic Literature by Scott Rettberg (Polity, 2019).

BEL frequently organizes international symposia and workshops, such as the Electronic Literature Knowledge Base Symposium and EcoDH seminar in 2018 and welcomes international speakers and visiting researchers. In 2015 we hosted the international Electronic Literature Organization conference and literary arts festival. We embrace innovative forms of scholarly publishing, such as a four-part series of collaborative articles, conversations and interviews on the Metainterface and critical works of artistic digital media published in 2018-19 in the electronic book review. BEL has published annual reports documenting group activities since 2011, which are available in the Knowledge Base.

Washington State University Vancouver‘s Electronic Literature Lab (ELL): Founded and directed by Dr. Dene Grigar, ELL is a media archaeology lab created for the advanced inquiry into the curation, documentation, preservation, and production of born digital literary works and other media. It serves as the site of digital preservation for the ELO and, so, manages the organization’s archives and repository. Additionally, ELL has hosted numerous post-doctoral scholars and has served as the site of numerous research projects, including Pathfinders(Grigar and Moulthrop, 2015) and Traversals (Moulthrop and Grigar, 2017); prominent exhibits of electronic literature at the Library of CongressInternational Symposium on Electronic Art, the British Computer Society, and other venues; five to seven Live Traversals of early born-digital literature each year; and an annual publication entitled Rebooting Electronic Literature that documents its many activities. It has been supported by grants, most notably from the National Endowment for the Humanities (2013) and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and through the university’s Lewis E. and Stella G. Buchanan Distinguished Professorship. Finally, the lab reconstitutes outmoded e-lit works, most recently Annie Grosshan’s The World Is Not Done Yet and Deena Larsen’s Kanji Kus. They are currently rebuilding Erik Loyer’s Strange Rain, Christy Sanford’s Red Mona, and Richard Holeton’s Figurski at Findhorn on Acid. Collaborating with Grigar on the conference will be Holly Slocum, ELL’s Project Manager; Nicholas Schiller’s ELL’s Associate Director, Mariusz Pisarki, ELL 2020-2021 Research Affiliate, Greg Philbrook, ELL’s Technical Specialist, and Kathleen Zoller, ELL’s Undergraduate Researcher.

dra.ft: dra.ft is a movement, a festival, a community, a long-term research project that explores emergent ideas of text and its future. It draws from the idea of poetic computation where the machine and author are collaborators. It is in these intersectional spaces that we can produce, perform and embody new meanings and develop new texts. The festival dra.ft encourages unfinished, work in progress, prototypes, tests (essentially drafts) of texts and text-making.

dra.ft is now an active online community of writers, designers and creative technologists engaging through virtual events, meet-ups and online social spaces.